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Got Blood?

Homestead saves lives in annual blood drive

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Giving back.

Helping those in need.

An easy way to save lives.

Many of the recent mass shootings and tragedies have hit close to home, on a level many students, teachers and even parents are unaware of. Every time just one of these shootings occurs, there is a strong need for blood. With one mass shooting, on average, a severely injured victim needs 241 pints, requiring that 241 people need to be willing to donate. At Homestead, we are able to participate in helping to give to these victims in an annual blood drive for the local Blood Center of Wisconsin.

This year, over 100 students in our building were willing to take time out of their school day to donate one pint of blood. Some students at our school even participated in the “Dual Red” donation. This entailed them to donating double the amount of blood, plasma and platelets. Many don’t realize this, but donating a single pint of blood can save up to three lives.

“I think it’s a really important thing to do. Just ten minutes out of your day could save three lives,” Silma Berrada, senior, said.

Although students and donors are the people who get the most recognition for their deed, nurses and Blood Center volunteers are the ones who make this whole process possible. They dedicate their career to obtaining blood from citizens who are willing to help, while also giving blood to the victims in need. Nurses are able to recognize the necessity of blood and how crucial it is to get donations.

“The most important thing is saving lives. Blood is just like medicine. My grandmother needed blood, so as soon as she got the blood she perked up. Blood can save three lives. It is greatly used, much needed, definitely a lifesaver,” Nicole S, Blood Center Nurse.

While most of the time, one pint can be enough to save three lives, in cases like mass shootings, many victims come into the hospital needing multiple pints to survive.

Blood Center of Wisconsin has said that each pint can save three lives, but we also know of devastating surgeries and accidents where patients need many pints to survive.  Each case is different but we know that blood is always needed.” Ms. Pfaff, student council adviser, and leader of the blood drive, said.

 

Mass shootings have sadly become the norm in the United States; this drives a strong need for blood and can be seen as a main “job” of the Blood Center. What most people forget about is that it isn’t and shouldn’t be the only purpose for gathering blood. People who go through cancer, surgical procedures and organ diseases are all patients who also have a need for blood and in our current society are sometimes put under the radar.

“My grandma has cancer and needed blood transfusion a while back, so I figured I could help someone out that needs it. I also want to do it to help the people that got injured from all the school shootings that have happened recently,” Catie Vierling, senior, said.

Many of us take for granted being healthy students and citizens. Often times it’s hard for us to comprehend the importance of blood donations,and how many people are in need. But, if the roles were reversed, and all of the healthy patients were sick, we would want donors to be willing to help us too.

“I [was] really nervous to [donate], but I know if I were in this situation that I would be really grateful for someone to do this for me,” Emily Schuyler, sophomore, said.

Through having the blood drive at our school, the process, while it can be nerve-wracking, also become very convenient for students and staff. After the blood drive, all the blood collected goes straight to the hospital, and if needed, it can go straight to patients.

“Honestly because you can use this for surgeries, and it’s very convenient, it goes right to the hospital to help people.” Ali Rahman, senior, said.  

The blood drive allows students, teachers and people from the community  help with the need for blood. With the mass shootings that occur in our society, as a school, many of us are able to say that we indeed did save three lives.

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Ally Wang, Staffer

Ally Wang is a Sophomore at Homestead High School, she is currently enrolled in the nonfiction writing and visual storytelling class. While Ally isn’t...

Lauren Curtis, Staffer

Lauren Curtis, a sophomore at Homestead High School, who is enrolled in nonfiction writing and visual storytelling class. While Lauren isn’t at school,...

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Got Blood?