Lifting up the fellow woman

Fighting to pursue her interests in math, Kayla Bublitz shares how important it has been throughout her life to practice respect and compassion for the women around her as a means for supporting the differences that make each of them unique.

Sofia

Fighting to pursue her interests in math, Kayla Bublitz shares how important it has been throughout her life to practice respect and compassion for the women around her as a means for supporting the differences that make each of them unique.

Irrefutably, women have been denied the opportunity to pursue studies in the STEM field time and time again throughout history. Nevertheless, the lack of female depiction in this area was no barrier blocking the motivation of the revolutionary females throughout time.
Take Emmy Noether, for example, who was denied the opportunity to attend a research university in Germany and could only audit a class there because she was a woman. Noether ultimately discovered a momentous theorem, (Noether’s theorem) that connected mathematics and physics. She went on to become a beloved teacher, inspiring women to ignite their curiosities and pursue their dreams.
Kayla Bublitz, mathematics teacher, shares how Noether has been an extensively influential participant in the budding stages of the pursuit for female contribution to science. On the topic of representation, Bublitz elucidates that “without trailblazing women like Noether, we would not have many of the big contributions that women have discovered in the STEM field. It is important for women to see themselves within STEM so they know there is a place for themselves to be successful.” As a math major at UW-Madison, Bublitz was often the only woman in a group of all men.
Throughout these projects, she recalls feeling that her input was not worthy. “I often felt unheard, though my ideas were just as good…this was frustrating at times, but it taught me to use my voice and not let anyone quiet it,” Bublitz said.
To Bublitz, school systems are fundamental constituents to furthering the advancements of female rights and in teaching the younger generations more about equality and unification for a brighter tomorrow. Students usually spend around 14 years of their lives in school before entering college, and these years spent in school observing, imitating, and learning from teachers and peers are extraordinarily formative in molding the identities that they will become in their adult lives.
“A school’s curriculum also plays a large role in teaching the youth generation about equality. Schools have the power to choose a curriculum that represents each student within their school and to teach students about the biases of the world. Teachers get the opportunity to prompt students to explore these big questions and topics related to gender, identity, and their role in society. Through the curriculum, conversations, and daily interactions, teachers and school systems can lay the groundwork for young people to understand that no one should have fewer opportunities or feel less accepted based on their gender,” Bublitz said.
Moreover, a colossal part of stepping in the pathway towards female empowerment has been and will be to continue to build up other women and fight the societally ingrained and automatic urge to discount others through tremendous and constant comparison and competition.
“We often see and hear of women comparing themselves on social media or in the hallways of school, tearing one another down in an effort to build ourselves up. “ ‘She’s gained weight, her hair is greasy, she’s stupid’ Think about your best friend, your mother, or a woman that you admire. If someone said these things to them, how would you feel? So why say them to another woman? These hurtful comments coming from women do not advance female empowerment. In doing so, we are only hurting ourselves as women. We need to team up and build each other up because we are all worthy, we all are smart and we all have something great to contribute to this world,” Bublitz said. “Keep your focus on your ‘why’ and don’t let anything or anyone stand in your way.”

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