Students participate in nationwide women’s marches

Advocates+for+women%27s+rights+attend+the+march+at+the+state+capitol+in+Madison%2C+Wis.+
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Students participate in nationwide women’s marches

Advocates for women's rights attend the march at the state capitol in Madison, Wis.

Advocates for women's rights attend the march at the state capitol in Madison, Wis.

Carly Rubin

Advocates for women's rights attend the march at the state capitol in Madison, Wis.

Carly Rubin

Carly Rubin

Advocates for women's rights attend the march at the state capitol in Madison, Wis.

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On President Donald Trump’s first day of office, more than three million people rallied in women’s marches. On Saturday, Jan. 21, the Women’s March on Washington marked the largest protest in United States history, with over three million people participating.

For those who couldn’t attend the main march in D.C., sister marches existed in over 700 other locations. On a local level, many attended the march in Madison, Wis., or Chicago, Ill. in solidarity for the cause.

Contrary to the violent protests on Trump’s inauguration day, the marches were peaceful and no arrests took place. Rather than advocating violence, protesters marched for equality, love and peace.

“It felt amazing to be involved in such a historic event. There was such a strong sense of love and support throughout the entire march that I will never forget,” Carly Rubin, senior, said.

Each rally featured famous speakers, politicians and supporters of the women’s rights movement. While some rallied in opposition to the inauguration of Donald Trump, all attendees were bonded over the common goal of advocating for women’s rights.

“It was an experience of a lifetime that I wish every woman regardless of their political or social beliefs had the opportunity to attend,” Eleanor White, senior, said. “It was breathtaking being part of 300,000 Americans of all ages and genders marching for the rights we deserve.”

Sporting pink hats and holding up posters, people of all ages, genders and beliefs, came together to form a united crowd of advocates for equality.

“It was a life changing experience to witness so many people from all different walks of life coming together to stand up and fight for what they believe in,” Izzy Schack, senior, said.

 

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